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The term bulldog has its roots in the Spanish custom of bullfighting. The Spanish tradition of fights of bulls with themselves and with dogs and other animals dates back to the antiquity. The spectacles of that sort were officially banned around 1830. Documents containing descriptions of fights, as well as the posters announcing them, are the historical reference. One can find proofs claiming that some Alanos participating in such fights were the intrepid bull tamers. There are posters advertising fights of Alano on arena with tigers, mandrills and wild boar. After the fights were prohibited, they were still taking place unofficially and without rules. The reasons to organize such parties were the special occasions for local societies, such as birthdays, weddings etc. The viewers were both the Christians and the Muslims. The last commonly available trial took its place in 1903 in Valencia. However, after over fifty years of break Alanos dispersed at the sight of a bull and didn't attempt to fight. Thirty years later on an exhibition in Madrid a specimen of the breed was shown for the last time. The limitation of the population of the Mochina mountain breed of cow, the popularity of firearms in hunting, the mechanization of life at the cottage has sentenced Alano to extinction. The dogs, the existence of which was justified by their practical purpose, and for which there was no longer any need, were becoming a history.

 

Nevertheless it was their history and heritage that caused them not to be forgotten. Two breeds being the direct descendants of Alano, namely Perro de Presa Canario and Perro de Presa Mallorquin, were acknowledged. Since the end of 1973 the recovery of the breed has been in progress, and it already has resulted in acceptation of the breed pattern by Royal Sociedad Canina de Espana in 2004.