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Dogs described as Alano Gentil or Alano Nobles, are later called just Alano. The term Lebrel isn't in use since the 19th century.


In  the 13th and 14th century the descriptions of Alano started to appear on the Spanish side of the Pyrenees. We find them in the present treasures of the Spanish literature from the 14th century. The description of Alano used as a pattern, according to which the dogs of that type were chosen, is found in the book of the Castilian prince Alfonso XI, devoted to monteria-style hunting. The prince sacrifices a whole chapter to Alano, describing in great detail how the genuine Alano should look like. Since the appearance of that description through all subsequent descriptions until now, the description of the head and sight fundamental for the expression of the breed keeps appearing. The descriptions in a position regarding monteria from the 15th century, conserved in a London and made popular in Spain by Prince Alzaman is a good example. According to the then-actual style, they contain a rich description of dogs, making many comparisons to other animals. Although Carlos Contera recovering the breed treated the descriptions seriously, nowadays the opinions regarding them are divided. Certainly, the best description of Alano comes from the aforementioned Martinez del Espinar in "Arte de Monteria y Ballesteria": "The most important dog we shall begin with is Alano. It is a hunting dog also used for cattle, it is smaller and stronger than Lebrel, it has a big head, deep. bloody and thrilling eyes. It is able to knock down every animal, no matter if it's a bull or a wild animal much bigger than itself". A pack of Alanos let ou was a real problem for peasants, as the dogs were attacking their household inventory that wasn't locked on time.